Teamsters

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Teamsters Weekly Updates, Ending July 19, 2018

James P. Hoffa: Message to the Amazon MAD4 Workers: International Brotherhood of Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa sends a letter of solidarity to striking Amazon workers in Spain.

Pension Reform, 2018 Election Top Issues at IBT Political Conference: Teamsters Local 700 Political Director Greg Ortiz was one of the many Teamsters who descended on Capitol Hill this week to lobby lawmakers and learn about the union’s plans to get involved and activate membership in advance of the 2018 election. Greg and other Teamsters from locals all over the U.S. spent today going from office to office meeting with elected officials and talking about pension reform, specifically the Butch Lewis Act.

Valley Teamsters Rally for Bill to Save Pension: Thousands of people, including some Teamsters from the Valley, are expected to rally in Columbus today in support of legislation that would rescue financially-troubled retirement plans.

Teamsters Overwhelmingly Approve Contract at Wegmans: After months of negotiations, members of Teamsters Local 118 employed in the Wegmans General Merchandise Warehouse overwhelmingly ratified a new five-year agreement. The general merchandise warehouse agreement is separate from the grocery and transportation agreement which is set for renegotiations next year.

Southern California Teamsters Ratify New Miller Beer Contract: With a 172-9 ‘Yes’ vote, workers at the Miller Brewery in Irwindale, California ratified their newest Teamsters contract. “Our members are pleased,” said Phil Cooper, Principal Officer and Secretary- Treasurer of Local 896. “The way the contract was negotiated they won’t have to pay anything for their medical costs, and that is something that we are really happy with.”

Southern Air Pilots Secure Tentative Letter of Agreement to Improve Pay, Standards: Pilots who fly for Southern Air, a subsidiary of Atlas Worldwide Holdings (NASDAQ: AAWW), announced today they have reached a tentative Letter of Agreement (LOA) that is intended to improve working conditions, wages and benefits for the Southern pilots. The LOA which will be voted on from July 25 to August 9, raises some standards at Southern Air — after two and a half years of stalled negotiations because of AAWW litigation — to be on par with those of pilots at AAWW-owned Atlas Air who are working under their own substandard, seven-year-old amalgamated contract. Pilots at both airlines are represented by their union, the Airline Pilots Association, Teamsters Local 1224.

Waste Equity Bill Passes City Council: Today, New York City Council passed the Waste Equity Bill (Intro 157) at its Stated Meeting, a bill that would cap the amount of waste handled by overburdened communities

Local 710 Vaccaro Trucking Members Unanimously Ratify New Contract: The Teamsters Local 710 Drivers and Forklift Operators voted unanimously to ratify their new five-year contract with Vaccaro Trucking last Friday.

Local 727 Representatives Attend SCI Shareholder Meeting and Demand Independent SCI Board Chairman: For the fifth consecutive year, a Teamsters Local 727 representative travelled to Service Corporation International’s Annual Shareholder Meeting in Houston, Texas in May to continue to insist on the appointment of an independent Board of Directors Chairman and to speak to the Board about the ongoing concerns of Funeral Directors in the Chicago market.
 

NEWS ARTICLES

James P. Hoffa: Message to the Amazon MAD4 Workers

International Brotherhood of Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa sends a letter of solidarity to striking Amazon workers in Spain. View the letter, here.

Pension Reform, 2018 Election Top Issues at IBT Political Conference

Teamsters Local 700 Political Director Greg Ortiz was one of the many Teamsters who descended on Capitol Hill this week to lobby lawmakers and learn about the union’s plans to get involved and activate membership in advance of the 2018 election. Greg and other Teamsters from locals all over the U.S. spent today going from office to office meeting with elected officials and talking about pension reform, specifically the Butch Lewis Act.

The bill would boost financially troubled multiemployer pensions so they don’t fail. It would create a new agency under the U.S. Treasury Department that would sell bonds in the open market to large investors such as financial firms.

Two of those Teamsters involved in such efforts were from Local 104 in Phoenix. Dawn Schumann, the local’s statewide political coordinator, and Ryan Proctor, a business agent, visited seven offices and met with lawmakers and staff. Their message was pension reform is necessary for workers.

“There needs to be some kind of reform for these members,” Proctor said. “They set this money aside. They worked these hours and are entitled to their pensions.”

Among their stops was to the office of Rep. David Schweikert (R-Ariz.), a member of the Joint Select Committee on Solvency of Multiemployer Pension Plans. There, they left 1,500 petitions from Arizona Teamsters asking the lawmaker to support the Butch Lewis Act.

Pensions were also a top issue during the first day of the Teamsters Political & Legislative Coordinators Conference, when several lawmakers spoke to attendees about the need for reform.
Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.), lead sponsor of the Butch Lewis Act in the House, thanked the Teamsters for all their work to get the word out on the legislation. “I’m delighted with what you have done on this,” he said. “The Democrats will hold fast. We have got to convince some Republicans. And I have a few in mind.”

One GOP lawmaker who doesn’t need any convincing is Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.). He became the first Republican to co-sponsor the bill, and said more in Congress need to stick up for pension reform. “I am proud to be on the bill and will do everything I can to enact it,” he said. “Working people kept their part of the deal on this. To lose [their pensions] now … is completely unfair.”

The concerns of the Teamsters, however, go beyond pensions. Speaking about trade, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) said the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is one area where a bipartisan solution involving the White House might be possible.

“Every year … we try to build a better template for NAFTA,” she said. “I hope this is an area where Democrats in Congress and the administration can find some common ground.”
Meanwhile, Teamsters General President Jim Hoffa, speaking to attendees, told them they must be ready to seize upon the momentum building to elect officials who will stand up for hardworking Americans.

“People are saying what the heck is going on,” he said. “Things are changing. We need to get people out to the polls. We have to be at the forefront to turn this thing around.”

Valley Teamsters Rally for Bill to Save Pension

AUSTINTOWN TWP., Ohio -Thousands of people, including some Teamsters from the Valley, are expected to rally in Columbus today in support of legislation that would rescue financially-troubled retirement plans.

Members of Teamsters Local 377 boarded a bus in Austintown this morning to travel to the state capital to attend the event being held in support of proposed Federal legislation known as the Butch Lewis Act of 2017.

The act introduced by Senator Sherrod Brown would provide a way to avoid retiree benefit reductions by providing relief to financially-troubled pension plans.

The bill is named after the former Teamsters Local 100 President who died in late 2015 while fighting to prevent cuts to the Teamsters’ Central States Pension Fund.

The legislation would establish a new agency that will be called the Pension Rehabilitation Administration (PRA) within the U.S. Treasury Department. The PRA would be authorized to issue bonds in order to finance loans to pension plans in financial distress.

Teamster officials say the bill could impact as many as 4,000 people in the valley who drove trucks for or worked in warehouses operated by companies such as Pepsi, Coke, UPS, Superior Beverage.

Teamsters Overwhelmingly Approve Contract at Wegmans
Teamsters Local 118 General Merchandise Warehouse Workers Win Wage Increases in Five-Year Agreement

(ROCHESTER, N.Y.) – After months of negotiations, members of Teamsters Local 118 employed in the Wegmans General Merchandise Warehouse overwhelmingly ratified a new five-year agreement. The general merchandise warehouse agreement is separate from the grocery and transportation agreement which is set for renegotiations next year.  

The ratified agreement provides for wage increases of 16.5 percent over the contract term, and increased night shift differentials along with a $500 ratification bonus. In addition, the new agreement improves language with respect to job bidding, vacations, rules, regulations and other areas.

“We are very pleased with the progress made in many areas of this new agreement. Reaching this five-year deal with the company underscores the company commitment to maintain general merchandise warehouse operations in the Rochester area,” said Local 118 Business Agent Paul Hogle. 

Local 118 represents approximately 4,300 members throughout the greater Rochester area.

Southern California Teamsters Ratify New Miller Beer Contract
By Ratifying New 3-year Agreement, Strike Averted

With a 172-9 ‘Yes’ vote, workers at the Miller Brewery in Irwindale, California ratified their newest Teamsters contract. “Our members are pleased,” said Phil Cooper, Principal Officer and Secretary- Treasurer of Local 896. “The way the contract was negotiated they won’t have to pay anything for their medical costs, and that is something that we are really happy with.”
Full medical coverage, pension increases, steady wage increases and a bonus have all been included in this contract at no cost to workers, a sticking point for the workers, one that they didn’t back down from.

Coming off of a strike possibility, this hard-fought agreement is a huge victory for Miller workers at Irwindale. “It was possible that a strike could happen”, said Joseph Perea, Local 896 shop steward. “We avoided a strike by coming together and fighting for the contract we deserve and that outcome was very positive”.

Besides the gains on medical insurance, workers were pleased to see that provisions for seasonal workers were included in the contract. “People were happy to see that 26-ers (seasonal workers) got some steady wage increases, it shows them they are just as valuable to the company as everybody else,” “They knew that we were very strong, that we would stick together and that we have a good team,” Perea said.

“Our representatives worked closely with Local 896 and the bargaining committee to achieve this victory,” said Greg Nowak, director of the Teamsters Brewery and Soft Drink Workers Conference.

This contract covers production, brewery, warehouse, customer service, clerical and distribution workers. This Miller brewing facility supplies Miller products to the entire Southern California region.

Southern Air Pilots Secure Tentative Letter of Agreement to Improve Pay, Standards

NATIONWIDE) -- Pilots who fly for Southern Air, a subsidiary of Atlas Worldwide Holdings (NASDAQ: AAWW), announced today they have reached a tentative Letter of Agreement (LOA) that is intended to improve working conditions, wages and benefits for the Southern pilots. The LOA which will be voted on from July 25 to August 9, raises some standards at Southern Air — after two and a half years of stalled negotiations because of AAWW litigation — to be on par with those of pilots at AAWW-owned Atlas Air who are working under their own substandard, seven-year-old amalgamated contract. Pilots at both airlines are represented by their union, the Airline Pilots Association, Teamsters Local 1224.

The LOA provides some temporary relief for the pilots who were forced to negotiate their contract with Southern Air during bankruptcy. As a result, Southern Air--which flies exclusively for DHL--has been unable to attract and retain pilots.

“Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings is finally acknowledging the full-blown staffing crisis at Southern Air that we’ve been raising concerns about,” said Captain Bryan Holmberg, a veteran pilot at Southern Air and the Southern Air Executive Council Chairman at APA Teamsters Local 1224. “We want to better serve the airline and the many customers across the globe who rely on our work, but to do so we need to stop the rapid turnover and hire pilots to meet DHL’s ever-growing demands.”

Pilots say they doubt this LOA can stem the tide on a shrinking pilot force and improve the overall working conditions enough to recruit crews that are necessary to grow the company as promised by AAWW executives. They say that years of failed recruiting efforts by AAWW using the same collective bargaining agreement (CBA) for the Atlas Pilots has proven that it is not adequate to attract and retain pilots in the current market place.

“Signing this LOA is a long overdue improvement for Southern’s pilots,” said Captain Daniel Wells, an Atlas Air pilot and president of Teamsters Local 1224. “This interim agreement does not resolve the fact that Southern Air and the pilots are still in negotiations to conclude a new Collective Bargaining Agreement and still in litigation with AAWW. AAWW is facing many issues under essentially the same contract with Atlas pilots, and with this LOA Southern Air will still face the same struggles with hiring and retention that Atlas Air currently does. If AAWW wants to grow its business, it needs to plan for pilots’ long-term success and negotiate fair, industry-standard contracts across its carriers.”

Waste Equity Bill Passes City Council

Today, New York City Council passed the Waste Equity Bill (Intro 157) at its Stated Meeting, a bill that would cap the amount of waste handled by overburdened communities.

The vote followed a press conference where Council Member Antonio Reynoso joined fellow New York City Council and Progressive Caucus colleagues, Teamsters Local 813, and advocacy organizations to demand equity for their communities.

Low income communities of color currently handle a staggeringly disproportionate amount of our City’s waste. The three communities this bill targets (North Brooklyn, South Bronx, and Southeast Queens) are home to 26 of the City’s 38 waste transfer stations. North Brooklyn alone possesses 38% of the City’s waste processing capacity.

Residents in these districts are exposed to dangerous truck traffic, elevated air pollution, and hazardous environmental impacts. The effects are apparent—residents have to dodge trucks tearing down their streets and suffer from some of the highest asthma rates in the nation.

To make matters worse, under the current system these overburdened communities have the permitted capacity to accept even more trash than they already do.

Since the idea of waste equity was introduced in the City’s Solid Waste Management Plan over a decade ago, communities, elected officials, and advocates have fought to bring fairness to the waste processing system.

Community activists across the city have been fighting for the passage of this bill for over a decade, and the Progressive Caucus of the New York City Council has advocated for this Waste Equity legislation through its legislative agenda for two consecutive terms. After a long uphill battle, the passage of Intro 157 will finally deliver environmental justice to frontline communities and ensure that no other neighborhood suffers the same fate, while setting a historic precedent for the fair share distribution of burdensome and polluting facilities in the City of New York.

Recent news coverage has exposed the sanitation industry’s mistreatment of workers, in addition to the communities where its facilities are sited. Many of the industry’s workers are non-union and are paid low wages in dangerous jobs.

The passage of Intro 157 represents a first, crucial step toward reforming the City’s commercial carting industry. Next month, the Department of Sanitation is expected to release its plan for zoned-collection of commercial waste, which will enact further reforms addressing inefficient routes, worker abuse, and low recycling rates.

“The passage of Intro 157 is a momentous achievement in the fight for environmental justice and the reform of our City’s private waste management system,” said Council Member Antonio Reynoso, sponsor of Intro. 157. “Currently, low-income communities of color handle a staggeringly disproportionate amount of our City’s waste.  Residents are exposed to dangerous truck traffic, elevated air pollution, and hazardous environmental impacts— contributing to historical inequities in resource distribution along economic and racial lines. Intro 157 will finally deliver environmental justice to frontline communities and ensure that no other neighborhood suffers the same fate, while setting a historic precedent for the fair share distribution of burdensome and polluting facilities in the City of New York. This is a first, crucial step toward reforming the City’s commercial carting industry.”

“This is a time of reckoning for an industry that routinely mistreats its workers and has for decades shouldered a handful of communities with the burden of processing waste for an entire city,” said Council Member Stephen Levin. “It’s time to put an end to this injustice. Int. 157 is a sensible and measured first step to bring relief to Southeast Queens, North Brooklyn, and the South Bronx. It will also protect other neighborhoods from becoming overburdened in the future as our city’s population grows. I’m proud to join Speaker Johnson and Council Member Reynoso in their fight to pursue justice, protect workers, and stand firmly on the side of the people.”

“In recent weeks, the reckless and negligent operations of New York City’s private waste haulers have finally gotten the attention they deserve, including the awful working conditions these companies force on their largely immigrant, Latino, and Black workforce,” said Council Member Donovan Richards. “We as elected officials can no longer sit idly by. It is high time that we hold the private sanitation companies responsible not only for their awful practices when collecting waste, but also when dumping and processing waste.  Int. 157 is the first step towards bringing true accountability to an industry in desperate need of reform. I’d like to thank Speaker Johnson and Council Member Reynoso for championing this important legislation for the communities of Southeast Queens, the South Bronx and North Brooklyn.”

“For years, waste has been unevenly distributed in our city, with the majority of it passed to low-income communities,” said Council Member Keith Powers. “Your zip code should not determine how much trash is in your neighborhood. I thank Council Members Reynoso and Levin for this legislation that looks to fairly manage waste.”

“Communities of color, including one I represent, have been disproportionately impacted by waste transfer stations and the pollution they produce,” said Council Member Diana Ayala. “The South Bronx, Southeast Queens, and North Brooklyn continue to face environmental challenges, including public health concerns, because of the lack of borough equity for handling waste. As the Co-Chair of the Progressive Caucus, I am thrilled to join my colleagues in championing Introduction 157, as it will ensure borough equity is established and environmental justice is served.”

“Waste is not something that just happens to a community. It is the direct result of how we decide to collect, transport, and dispose of it. Unfortunately, like so many other aspects of New York City, some communities are more overburdened with waste collection sites than others, and these communities are almost always communities of color, immigrant, or low-income. Since every New Yorker has a right to clean air, clean water, and clean streets, justice demands that we more equitably distribute our waste so that no one, through no fault of their own, is exposed to pollution and disease. This bill is a powerful step in the direction of this environmental justice,” said City Council Member Carlos Menchaca.

“By capping the amount of waste processed in the most overburdened neighborhoods, Intro 157 will bring needed relief to low-income communities of color that have long been treated as a dumping ground for the rest of the city’s garbage, and take a bold step to secure environmental justice for all New Yorkers,” said Council Member Margaret S. Chin. “No single community should have to deal with noxious air pollution or have its quality of life compromised by the inordinate amount of waste being trucked to its streets every day. I thank Chair Reynoso, Council Member Levin, Speaker Johnson and advocates for their exemplary leadership on this legislation, which will ensure that every neighborhood does its fair share to protect our environment.”

“For far too long, a handful of communities in our city have unfairly borne the brunt of our trash handling system. They have been forced to live with the air pollution, noise, and other impacts coming from the waste facilities themselves, as well as the hundreds of trucks that visit them daily. With Intro 157, we have a real opportunity to bring environmental justice to these communities, and establish a precedent for the fair share distribution of waste-handling facilities across the five boroughs. Let’s pass this bill and complete what the Solid Waste Management Plan started. Thank you to Council Members Reynoso and Levin for their leadership on this critical issue,” said Council Member Helen Rosenthal.

“Today’s vote on Intro 157 is truly a watershed moment for environmental justice,” said Eddie Bautista, Executive Director, New York City Environmental Justice Alliance. “Our communities have been fighting for relief from waste facilities and trucks traffic for decades. Finally, we will see this first critical step toward waste equity, and ensure that local communities – particularly the three most impacted – finally begin to realize some semblance of fair share.”

“We don’t just work in these communities, we live here too,” said George Miranda, President of Teamsters Joint Council 16. “We know we can have clean air, environmental justice, and good jobs at the same time. The Waste Equity Bill will more fairly distribute this industry’s impacts, and sets the stage for broader reforms later this summer to protect workers, increase recycling, and cut truck traffic through zoned-collection of commercial waste.”

“Today, the City Council is taking action to address longstanding racial inequity in our waste system that simply shouldn’t be tolerated in our city,” said Rachel Spector, Director of Environmental Justice at New York Lawyers for the Public Interest. “Thanks to decades of organizing by impacted communities, Intro 157 will bring a measure of relief to neighborhoods overburdened by waste trucks and move the city one step closer to an equitable and less polluting waste system.”

“As far back as the 1989 New York City Charter Revision, which added a “fair share” provision, city officials have recognized that some neighborhoods were bearing disproportionate environmental burdens from concentrations of waste-handling facilities.  Intro 157 represents a long-awaited first step to right this wrong — thanks to the leadership of Councilmembers Antonio Reynoso and Stephen Levin and Speaker Corey Johnson,” said Eric A. Goldstein, NYC Environment Director at the Natural Resources Defense Council.

“For far too long the Communities of North Brooklyn have been environmentally overburdened by  processing almost 40% of New York City Solid Waste, generating unsafe conditions for our seniors and Children. Due to the amount of garbage trucks passing through our streets, we have one of the highest rates of asthma in the City of New York. Intro 157 will secure once and for all, that not only North Brooklyn, but other communities of color in New York City don’t have to be burdened with a high volume of garbage coming to their communities. We applaud the leadership of the Speaker of New York City Council, Corey Johnson, and we thank Councilmembers Antonio Reynoso and Stephen Levin for their commitment to environmental justice in New York City.” Ray Kairys, Organizations United for Trash Reduction and Garbage Equity (OUTRAGE) Steering Committee Chair “Decades of struggling for environmental justice has brought us to this critical vote,” said Angela Tovar, Director of Community Development, THE POINT CDC. “We hope the City Council does right by overburdened communities of color like the South Bronx and takes this small but essential step toward waste equity.”

“El Puente supports Intro 157 to cut truck pollution, traffic, and noise,” Leslie Velasquez, Environmental Justice Program Manager, El Puente. “Our community deserves protection from any more diesel-burning garbage trucks, and the city needs to more fairly distribute this environmental burden.”

“Intro 157 is Responsible legislation and a collaborative effort – a compromising bill that does not say ‘Not in my backyard!’ but instead says ‘Not ALL in my backyard!’” said Rev. Dan Rodriguez of Waste Equity for Southeast Queens. “The City Council have an opportunity today to ensure that all boroughs carry each other’s burdens so that all involved can become better citizens of the neighborhoods in which we work, live and serve.”

“Finally, the Bronx may have some relief and protection from noxious garbage and runaway truck traffic,” said Jessica Clemente, We Stay/ Nos Quedamos. “We hope the passing of Intro 157 will help launch even more ambitious efforts to truly bring environmental justice citywide.”

“I trust that the day is coming when there will be less garbage trucks spewing emissions on the streets of Southeast Queens,” said Andrea Scarborough, Community Activist – Southeast Queens. “This affects the quality of life and the health of my neighbors.  I hope that with the passage of Intro 157 a new era of environmental justice will begin for Southeast Queens.”

“When you talk about who bears the brunt of our sanitation system in New York City, you have to talk about race,” said Maritza Silva Farrell, Executive Director of ALIGN. “It is Black and Latino communities that host the majority of private waste transfer stations. It is Black and Latino workers who are endangered in their operations. Today’s vote is the first step toward bringing justice to this industry, and we will take several more steps when a strong commercial waste zone plan is released later this summer.”

“This is bigger than New York City, this is a global issue that reaches far beyond our five boroughs,” said Dior Doward, a worker-owner at GreenFeen OrganiX. “Passing Intro 157-C will move us closer to aligning city goals like OneNYC with the heart of the EJ movement. Workers of the Bronx must be able to take our power back through alternative economics and demand a better quality of life by achieving waste equity.”

“It is the responsibility of the current generation to look out for the future generation, therefore please vote for intro 157,” said Dr. Walter R. Dogan, President of the Brinkerhoff Action Association.

Local 710 Vaccaro Trucking Members Unanimously Ratify New Contract

The Teamsters Local 710 Drivers and Forklift Operators voted unanimously to ratify their new five-year contract with Vaccaro Trucking last Friday.

Teamsters secured hourly wage increases of $0.50 per year over the life of the contract – doubling the previous contract’s hourly increases of $0.25 per year. Local 710 also secured increased employer contributions to health and welfare, which helps decrease the contributions made by the members.

The Bargaining Committee for the Union led by Business Agent Mike Ramirez and rank-and-file member Glenn Crosson met a handful of times with the company to negotiate the strongest contract the members have had.

“Glenn and Mike did a great job going through this contract with a fine-toothed comb to ensure members get the benefits they deserve,” said Secretary-Treasurer Mike Cales. “They focused on what was important to the members and worked hard to put that into solid contract language.”

Additional improvements include increased paid sick days and increased mileage rates.

Teamsters Local 710 represents more than 13,000 members across the Midwest and is an affiliate of Teamsters Joint Council 25, America’s premier labor union for Chicago, Illinois and northwest Indiana.

Local 727 Representatives Attend SCI Shareholder Meeting and Demand Independent SCI Board Chairman

For the fifth consecutive year, a Teamsters Local 727 representative travelled to Service Corporation International’s Annual Shareholder Meeting in Houston, Texas in May to continue to insist on the appointment of an independent Board of Directors Chairman and to speak to the Board about the ongoing concerns of Funeral Directors in the Chicago market.

Speaking directly to SCI shareholders, Local 727 Senior Business Representative Nick Micaletti and International Brotherhood of Teamsters representative Dan Willet stressed the importance of an independent Chairman, saying, “Not only is an independent chair considered a governance ‘best practice,’ but it is imperative in a case like SCI where the Directors overlook the potential for conflicts of interest by allowing multiple company executives to not only serve but lead the Board long-term.”  The SCI Board of Directors, which is responsible for overseeing the Funeral-industry giant, is currently chaired by SCI’s C.E.O. Thomas Ryan.

Though the proposal did not receive the necessary 51% of votes to pass, it did receive a 5% bump in support over last year’s vote resulting in a record 40% of shareholders voting in favor of an independent chairman.

“Each year we receive more and more support from shareholders,” said John Coli Jr., Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters Local 727.  “It’s important that we continue to go to Houston each and every year to impress upon the Board of Directors the importance of independent leadership and the needs of funeral directors here in the Chicago market.”

The Union pressed the Board to consider increasing benefit and retirement levels.  Micaletti stressed to shareholders the need for compensation packages that are regionally competitive and their importance in keeping SCI Funeral Directors serving the communities in which they live.

“Local 727 will continue to fight for our SCI members through every available avenue,” added Coli.  “Whether it’s through negotiations, the filing of grievances, or travelling to Texas every May, this Union will not stop until funeral directors receive what is fair and right.”

Members with questions should contact Local 727 Business Representative Nick Micaletti at (847) 696-7500 or nick@teamsterslocal727.org.

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