Teamsters

North America's Strongest Union

Teamsters Weekly Update, Week Ending April 18, 2019

Local Union Leaders Overwhelmingly Endorse Tentative YRC Freight, Holland and New Penn National Master Freight Agreement: Leaders of all local unions that represent workers at YRC Freight, Holland and New Penn met today and with the exception of one local voted unanimously to endorse the tentative National Master Freight Agreement covering approximately 30,000 Teamsters, paving the way for a vote by the membership.

California Port Truck Drivers Awarded Over $1.2 Million for Wage Theft: Ten California port truck drivers who haul cargo for Best Buy, Puma and Lowe’s have been awarded more than $1.2 million by the California Labor Commissioner for wage theft due to misclassification as independent contractors.

Workers at First Student (Bay Path) Dudley/Charlton, Massachusetts Join Teamsters Local 170 : On Friday, April 5, 2019 workers from First Student (Bay Path) voted overwhelmingly to join Teamsters Local 170. These workers are part of a growing movement of drivers and monitors who are organizing with the Teamsters Union because of the representation and benefits that come with a Teamster contract.

Workers at Durham School Services in Everett, Wash. Join Teamsters Local 38 With over 90 percent of the bargaining unit participating in the election, Teamsters material specialists voted overwhelmingly to ratify their tentative agreement with Southwest Airlines.

Truck Drivers Who Haul for Rio Tinto Attend Company's AGM:  On Wednesday, April 10, 2019, a delegation of contract truck drivers who haul borax from the Rio Tinto mines in Boron, Calif., to the Port of Los Angeles, together with Teamster leaders, attended the company’s Annual General Meeting in London, England. The drivers, who are employed by Rio Tinto’s contract drayage carrier California Cartage Express, a division of NFI Industries, attended the meeting with Teamster officials to demand an end to wage theft due to their misclassification as independent contractors (rather than employees) and enforcement of the Rio Tinto's Supplier Code of Conduct in their U.S. supply chain.

Teamsters Ratify New Contract at Rhode Island Hospital: The more than 2,500 Local 251 Teamsters who work at Rhode Island Hospital ratified a new five-year agreement yesterday by a 97.5 percent vote.

Nurses at Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho Vote to Join Teamsters Local 690: By a vote of 157 to 44, registered nurses at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho, voted to join Teamsters Local 690 in Spokane, Wash.

Possible School Bus Strike in Québec’s Eastern Townships: About thirty school bus drivers employed by Autobus DL voted by a margin of 91% to authorize a strike. The work stoppage will occur at a time deemed appropriate by their union, Teamsters Local Union 106. Wages are the main sticking point.

After a Four Year Battle, West Coast Carhaulers Ratify First Contract with North American Auto Transport: A story that started more than four years ago has at long last reached a satisfying conclusion today, as carhaul drivers working for North American Auto Transport throughout the Western USA have successfully ratified their first-ever Teamster contract. This contract will make the group of nearly 70 drivers and mechanics into full-fledged Teamsters – many for the first time in their careers – after a grueling battle of company ownership vs. employees that nearly led to bankruptcy and dissolution of the company.

XPO Workers in Erie, Pennsylvania Seek Teamster Representation : XPO freight drivers in Erie, Pennsylvania filed for Teamster representation on April 9, 2019, the latest action by workers across the U.S. who are banding together to fight for fair treatment at one of the largest transportation and logistics companies in the world.
 

NEWS ARTICLES

Local Union Leaders Overwhelmingly Endorse Tentative YRC Freight, Holland and New Penn National Master Freight Agreement: Leaders of all local unions that represent workers at YRC Freight, Holland and New Penn met today and with the exception of one local voted unanimously to endorse the tentative National Master Freight Agreement covering approximately 30,000 Teamsters, paving the way for a vote by the membership.

“Negotiations were very difficult and complex, but we strongly believe we have negotiated an agreement that will protect the livelihoods of our members over the next five years,” said Ernie Soehl, Director of the Teamsters National Freight Division. “Every member of our negotiating committee believes that the YRCW companies cannot afford any more money than what is contained in this tentative agreement and that there is not a single penny more to get. We pushed the company to the absolute limit.”
The tentative agreement contains numerous improvements, including:

  • $4.00 in wage increases over five years for the vast majority of workers (an 18% increase for most drivers and dockworkers) including a $1.00 wage increase retroactive to April 1, 2019 (a 4.5% increase for most drivers and dockworkers);

  • Significant increases for dock-only, clerical, maintenance employees, janitors, and porters hired after February 2014 including a minimum of an immediate $1.00 wage increase retroactive to April 1, 2019;

  • Restoration of the week of vacation that was given up (in other words, employees otherwise entitled to four, five and six weeks of vacation) effective April 1, 2019. This will require the three companies to restore approximately 14,000 additional weeks of vacation every year;

  • Protection of health and welfare benefits with no employee premium co-pays. Up to $0.50 per hour increases each year for most funds. The company agreed to provide other funds with fixed guaranteed amounts to maintain benefits;

  • Improved language to curb excessive executive bonuses; and

  • Prohibitions against using driverless trucks.

(Click here or a longer list of improvements. Click here for answers to frequently asked questions.)

For the past decade, the YRCW operating companies have operated under a series of Memoranda of Understandings (MOUs) that contained significant economic concessions necessary to allow the company to survive. At the outset of bargaining, in addition to seeking to reverse the trend of giving concessions, the union committee determined that it was necessary to get out from under the MOU structure and return to a traditional NMFA contract structure. The members had not had a new contract in nearly a decade. The tentative agreement accomplishes that, restores the traditional contractual structure and provides for significant economic and non-economic improvements for Teamsters. This was no small task because the YRCW companies continue to face financial difficulties, need to upgrade equipment and must seek to recapture market share.

The Teamsters National Freight Industry Negotiating Committee (TNFINC) for these negotiations was made up of nearly 30 officers and agents from numerous local unions across the country. At all times, the focus was about trying to restore as much as possible for the members and get improvements wherever possible. “The entire committee was, and remains, completely committed to the membership,” Soehl said. “The livelihoods of nearly 30,000 workers hang in the balance and 30,000 families count on the health care provided under this contract.”

Soehl said the union committee worked extremely hard and dug into the minute details of the companies’ operations, finances and how to maximize protections and benefits for the members. In the end, every single member of the bargaining committee supports and recommends this tentative agreement.

The tentative agreement contains significant economic and language improvements for the membership, as well as creative tools for the companies to use to increase market-share, expand into new areas of opportunity, and improve service while at the same time protecting and enhancing jobs, seniority, working conditions, and earning opportunities for the membership (see inside for more information). The committee also beat back numerous efforts by the companies to impose health care premium co-pays and other givebacks.

On or about April 19, members will be mailed voting information. The vote will be by secret ballot as it always has been, but this time members will vote via the internet or phone.
The vote will be conducted through the BallotPoint Election Services voting system. In the packet being mailed, members will find the agreement and a summary of the highlights including questions and answers. But instead of a paper ballot, members will find an individual access code and simple instructions on how to use the access code to vote by telephone or internet.

The Teamsters Union has used BallotPoint extensively over the past four years to conduct contract ratifications, including the recent ABF Freight, UPS, UPS Freight and Costco elections. All of the ratifications were conducted without incident or challenges.

Votes will be counted on or about May 3.Click here for a PDF of this update. Click here for highlights of the tentative National Master Freight Agreement, answers to frequently asked questions, and to view all of the tentative agreements.

California Port Truck Drivers Awarded Over $1.2 Million for Wage Theft: Teamsters, Community Leaders Stand With Drivers in Fight Against Misclassification: (PORT OF LOS ANGELES/LONG BEACH, Calif.) – Ten California port truck drivers who haul cargo for Best Buy, Puma and Lowe’s have been awarded more than $1.2 million by the California Labor Commissioner for wage theft due to misclassification as independent contractors.

The decision orders K&R Transportation, which was purchased by NFI Industries in 2017, to pay the drivers for unpaid wages, unpaid meal and rest breaks and illegal paycheck deductions based on claims filed in 2017. The company has until April 25, 2019, to either appeal or pay the drivers the amounts owed; if they do neither, then the decisions will become final judgments. If final judgments go unpaid, K&R’s customers could be held liable for future claims under California’s new joint liability law, Senate Bill 1402.

Click on the links below to read:

  • Fact sheet regarding the April 2019 Order, Decision, and Awards against K&R Transportation;

  • CA Labor Commissioner’s Order, Decision, and Awards;

  • Fact sheet on the history of lawlessness at the California Cartage family of companies, which were purchased by NFI Industries, at the Ports of LA/Long Beach;

  • Summary of the Labor Commissioner’s decisions at the Ports of LA/Long Beach.

Hector Zelaya, a K&R Transportation driver who was featured in a story in The Nation in August 2018, is one of the 10 drivers to receive news that justice had been served on Friday.
“We’re happy that the California Labor Commissioner has recognized the injustices we’ve experienced at the hands of K&R Transportation,” Zelaya said. “They’ve taken advantage of us for far too long and it will not stand. This decision is a great step, but justice will not truly be served until companies like K&R completely end their law-breaking practices, stop the wage theft and the abuse we endure on the job every day, and classify us as the employees we truly are. My co-workers and I will continue to stand with each other and fight for what is rightfully ours.”

“We are sick and tired of these companies taking advantage of hard-working drivers like those at K&R Transportation,” said Eric Tate, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters Local 848, which now represents more than 500 port truck drivers who have successfully secured their employee rights. “The Labor Commissioner’s award will provide temporary relief to these 10 families who have suffered from wage theft; however, K&R Transportation – like NFI’s other port truck companies – continues to illegally classify its drivers as ‘independent contractors’ and we are doing everything in our power to let retailers like Puma, Lowe’s, and Best Buy know that they’ll be held liable unless they move their business to companies that are following US tax and labor laws.”

"It is reprehensible that retailers like Lowe’s continue to do business with law-breaking companies that take advantage of vulnerable immigrant port truck drivers by misclassifying them as independent contractors, stealing their wages, and denying them safe meal and rest breaks,” said Myron Wollin, President of the Long Beach Gray Panthers. “These retailers need to step up and take strong action to assure that the law breaking will not be tolerated.”

Drivers from K&R Transportation were among those featured in an investigative series published by the USA Today Network in 2017. K&R Transportation operates in Wilmington, Calif., on property owned by the Port of Los Angeles. In January 2019, K&R’s new owner, NFI Industries, announced its intention to vacate the property rather than reach an agreement to end labor disruptions on the Port’s prime property. In their quest for employee rights and fair treatment, K&R drivers, together with other NFI drivers and warehouse workers, have gone on strike seven times over a five-year period causing significant disruption to port operations leading the Los Angeles City Council to unanimously revoke NFI’s lease. The company, along with two other NFI Industry subsidiaries, was sued by the Los Angeles City Attorney for misclassification and unfair business practices in January 2018. The suit is ongoing.
Port drivers are working together with the Teamsters Union and other labor, community and faith allies to fight for change in the port trucking industry. More than 75,000 strong, port drivers haul imports and exports, keeping the American economy running.

Workers At First Student (Bay Path) Dudley/Charlton, Massachusetts Join Teamsters Local 170: (WORCESTER, Mass.) – On Friday, April 5, 2019 workers from First Student (Bay Path) voted overwhelmingly to join Teamsters Local 170. These workers are part of a growing movement of drivers and monitors who are organizing with the Teamsters Union because of the representation and benefits that come with a Teamster contract.

“The solidarity that these First Student drivers maintained from start to finish in this organizing campaign is something to be very proud of,” Local 170 Secretary-Treasurer Shannon George said.

Workers at Durham School Services in Everett, Wash. Join Teamsters Local 38 Durham Workers Join Growing Movement of Support for Teamsters Union: (EVERETT, Wash.) – On Friday, drivers at Durham School Services in Everett, Wash. voted by more than a three-to-one margin to join Teamsters Local 38. The 127 workers are part of a growing movement of drivers and monitors who are organizing with the union because of the representation and benefits that come with a Teamster contract.

“The solidarity that Durham drivers maintained from start to finish in this organizing campaign is something to be very proud of,” Local 38 Secretary-Treasurer Steven Chandler said. “Local 38 and the Durham drivers worked countless hours to ensure that our organizing plan worked. Our efforts paid off for the betterment of these new Teamsters.”

Durham driver Dan Jones is a member of the organizing committee at the Everett school bus yard. He worked very closely with Local 38 Business Agent and Organizer Mike Raughter, along with many others, to ensure that the campaign was a success.

"I am proud of my fellow co-workers and the results of this election,” Jones said. “This wasn't just a 'yes,' this was a resounding yes! This is the way we want to move forward with Local 38.”

“This Durham organizing campaign was driven by the commitment and perseverance of the committee,” Raughter said. “They want a voice in their workplace for themselves and their co-workers, and they delivered that message overwhelmingly. I couldn’t be more happy for our new Teamster sisters and brothers”.

Teamsters Local 38 represents workers in a wide variety of industries throughout Snohomish County, Washington.

Truck Drivers Who Haul for Rio Tinto Attend Company's AGM Rio Tinto Chairman Publicly Agrees to Investigate and Take Action to Enforce Code of Conduct: (LONDON AND PORT OF LOS ANGELES, Calif.) – On Wednesday, April 10, 2019, a delegation of contract truck drivers who haul borax from the Rio Tinto mines in Boron, Calif., to the Port of Los Angeles, together with Teamster leaders, attended the company’s Annual General Meeting in London, England. The drivers, who are employed by Rio Tinto’s contract drayage carrier California Cartage Express, a division of NFI Industries, attended the meeting with Teamster officials to demand an end to wage theft due to their misclassification as independent contractors (rather than employees) and enforcement of the Rio Tinto's Supplier Code of Conduct in their U.S. supply chain.

“It took tremendous courage for the Cal Cartage Express drivers to leave their families, travel to London, and confront the global mining giant Rio Tinto. The Teamsters are proud to be supporting these men in their fight for justice at America’s largest seaport, and heartened by Chairman Simon Thompson’s willingness to listen to them and take action,” said Fred Potter, Vice President, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, and Director of the Teamsters Port Division. “The fact is that NFI Industries' subsidiary California Cartage Express, which hauls borax from the Rio Tinto Boron Mine to the Port of Los Angeles, has a demonstrable track record of violating Rio Tinto’s Code of Conduct. The hardworking truck drivers who haul this heavy cargo 150 miles from Boron to the harbor have experienced wage theft due to unlawful misclassification by their employer, Cal Cartage Express as independent contractors rather than employees. The Teamsters Union is committed to making certain that Rio Tinto enforces its Supplier Code of Conduct by committing to doing business only with trucking companies that align with Rio Tinto’s values.”

“We came before Rio Tinto’s Board of Directors and shareholders to bring light to the worker exploitation taking place in the company’s supply chain and told them why we believe that Rio Tinto must take swift action against this exploitation,” said Gustavo Villa, a port truck driver for Cal Cartage Express/NFI Industries.

“We’re not asking for a lot. We’re not asking to strike it rich. We’re only asking for what’s fair. We’re asking for a living wage, to be properly classified as employees. We want dignity and respect on the job. I traveled a long way to speak and I hope that by sharing my struggles the Board of Directors will open its eyes and see that injustice happening in Rio Tinto’s supply chain every day. Rio Tinto is not my employer, but they have the power to step in and stop this abuse,” said Jesus Maldonado, a port truck driver with Cal Cartage Express.

Rio Tinto is a global mining company headquartered in Melbourne, Australia. The Rio Tinto Boron Mine in Boron, California, is the largest borax mine in the world, producing “nearly half of the world’s supply of refined borate products.” (Source: riotinto.com). Borax, a commonly used mineral, is a component of many detergents, cosmetics and enamel glazes. Borate compounds are used to strengthen cellphone, computer, and television LCD screens to keep them from warping under high temperature.

Rio Tinto has a Supplier Code of Conduct that requires that its vendors uphold “fundamental human rights,” including, “Ensuring all work is freely chosen; without the use of forced or compulsory labour; ensuring fair remuneration and work conditions for all workers; promoting humane treatment and preventing harassment and unfair discrimination; and respecting workers’ rights to lawfully and peacefully form or join trade unions of their choosing and to bargain collectively.”

Click here for evidence that Rio Tinto is not complying with its own Supplier Code of Conduct.

With the dedicated support from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, community, and faith allies, we are fighting to change the logistics industry so we can win justice for ourselves and our families. We haul and handle our country’s imports and exports for retail companies, for manufacturers, and for the U.S. Military. We are proud to be professional truck drivers and proud of the service we provide. Without us, America would stop.

Teamsters Ratify New Contract at Rhode Island Hospital Contract Provides Wage Increases, Quality Health Insurance and Retirement Options: (PROVIDENCE, R.I.) – The more than 2,500 Local 251 Teamsters who work at Rhode Island Hospital ratified a new five-year agreement yesterday by a 97.5 percent vote.

“The 2,500 members at Rhode Island Hospital should be proud. It was their solidarity that led to this agreement,” said Matt Taibi, Teamsters Local 251 Secretary-Treasurer. “This contract wasn’t won at the table; it was earned through months of organizing by our members. They stood strong in the face of the company and achieved a contract they deserve.”
The bargaining unit includes nonclinical and clinical support and skilled maintenance workers.

After months of member to member organizing and surveying the needs of the members, the union negotiating committee set out to satisfy key demands of the workers. This contract addresses the important issues of fair wage increases, a $15 minimum wage, Teamster health care benefits, retirement security, quality jobs that support families and job security. Highlights of the contract include:

  • Three percent raises in each year of the contract;
  • Retirement choice between the Lifespan Core plan or matching contributions to a 401(k) up to six percent;

  • Strong improvements to pay differentials (on-call pay; weekend differential; evening differential; and night differential);

  • Inclusion into the Teamsters 251 Health Services Plan;

  • Extended “No Layoff” protections; and

  • A mechanism for creation of more permanent positions.

Located just south of downtown Providence, Rhode Island Hospital’s main campus occupies more than five blocks. Additionally, the Teamsters represent workers at the hospital’s numerous satellite buildings throughout the state of Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts.Voting took place throughout the day at the local union’s hall.

“This is the best contract I’ve seen in my 25 years as a Rhode Island Hospital Teamster,” said Paul Santos, Local 251 President and an over 30-year veteran hospital employee. “We should be proud of the entire negotiating team. They stuck through months of hard bargaining, but ultimately it was the strength of the membership that made this victory possible.”

Nurses at Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho Vote to Join Teamsters Local 690 Registered Nurses Seek Safe Staffing Levels for Patients, Job Security: (LEWISTON, Idaho) – By a vote of 157 to 44, registered nurses at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho, voted to join Teamsters Local 690 in Spokane, Wash.

The nurses voted on Wednesday, April 10 and Thursday, April 11. There are 225 nurses in the bargaining unit.

The nurses are seeking safe staffing levels for their patients, affordable and quality health insurance, job security and an end to the erosion of their benefits.

“As Teamsters, we will have a stronger voice to make sure our patients receive the excellent care they deserve,” said Joe Thon, a nurse at the hospital for 14 years. “We also will address job security and protection of our benefits.”

“These nurses provide a vital service to their community, and they want to make sure the level of care is the best it can be,” said Val Holstrom, Secretary-Treasurer of Local 690. “They also want to feel secure in their jobs. We will address these issues when we negotiate a first contract.”

“Across the country, health care workers like the nurses in Lewiston are forming their union as Teamsters,” said Nina Bugbee, Director of the Teamsters Health Care Division. “Workers know that as Teamsters, they will have the backing of the most powerful union in North America to improve their lives.”

Possible School Bus Strike in Québec’s Eastern Townships: Laval, QC, April 10, 2019 – About thirty school bus drivers employed by Autobus DL voted by a margin of 91% to authorize a strike. The work stoppage will occur at a time deemed appropriate by their union, Teamsters Local Union 106. Wages are the main sticking point.

“Despite their many responsibilities, school drivers are the lowest-paid professional drivers in Québec. When workers who earn about $20,000 a year are ready to go on strike, you know it means they’ve had enough,” explained the president of Teamsters Local Union 106, Jean Chartrand.

The collective agreement expired last summer. The union is hoping to avoid a strike, but management is not ready to make any new offers and no new meetings between parties have been scheduled at this time. The union wants to conclude a negotiated settlement as quickly as possible in order to avoid inconveniencing parents and students.

Between 3000 and 3500 students at the Eastern Townships School Board and the Commission scolaire du Val-des-Cerfs may find themselves without school bus service. Out of solidarity with parents, the union is promising to provide advance notice of any work stoppage. The idea is to give parents as much time as possible to find other options for taking their kids to school.

“Working conditions in this industry are difficult. On top of low wages, school bus drivers have to deal with split shifts, bad weather, poor roads, students’ behaviour and impatient or aggressive motorists,” added Jean Chartrand.

After a Four Year Battle, West Coast Carhaulers Ratify First Contract with North American Auto Transport: Purchase of Selland Auto Transport by North American Auto Transport averts bankruptcy and finally leads to a strong first contract for West Coast Teamsters

A story that started more than four years ago has at long last reached a satisfying conclusion today, as carhaul drivers working for North American Auto Transport throughout the Western USA have successfully ratified their first-ever Teamster contract. This contract will make the group of nearly 70 drivers and mechanics into full-fledged Teamsters – many for the first time in their careers – after a grueling battle of company ownership vs. employees that nearly led to bankruptcy and dissolution of the company.

This story of worker triumph began with a successful organizing drive at carhaul company Selland Auto Transport nearly four years ago, when Local 174 Secretary-Treasurer Rick Hicks received a lead for a potential organizing campaign from Local 174 Director of Organizing Meaza Ogbe and Recording Secretary/Senior Business Agent Carl Gasca. When Hicks realized that the opportunity at Selland spanned five different Teamster Joint Councils across the West, he reached out to IBT Carhaul Director Kevin Moore to suggest a Regional Agreement. Following that discussion, a plan was developed and eventually workers across California, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Montana all voted to join the Teamsters to improve their conditions on the job. Once that vote was certified, contract negotiations with Selland management began.

However, it quickly became apparent that Selland management was willing to do anything they could to impede the process of negotiating a fair contract with their employees. Management fought back against even the most basic and non-controversial tenets of a union contract; they paid steep fines for illegally retaliating against Union supporters; they endured a one-day strike that halted their operations up and down the West coast; they watched their most experienced workers leave the company to find better working conditions elsewhere; and they watched their business wither as they insisted on focusing all their time, energy, and resources on waging war against their employees’ rights to fair treatment on the job.

Eventually, as Selland teetered on the brink of bankruptcy, company ownership finally admitted defeat and sold the company’s remaining operations to North American Auto Transport. Once the purchase was finalized, union-friendly North American leadership and the Teamsters were able to quickly work through the remaining issues and reach a contract proposal that was acceptable and fair to both sides. Over the course of this past weekend, drivers in Seattle, Portland, San Bernardino, and Oakland attended meetings in their respective cities to learn about and vote on the proposed contract. The votes were counted today, and the contract was ratified by a margin of over 91%.

The new contract makes dramatic improvements to just about every aspect of the job. Improved ‘Hours of Service’ rules will much more effectively protect drivers from unsafe excessive overtime; a robust grievance procedure will protect drivers from unjust discipline; bargaining unit work will be protected from widespread subcontracting; and crucially, owner-operators will finally receive access to life-changing benefits they never had before, including protection from layoff based on seniority, access to healthcare, access to retirement. Most importantly of all, workers will soon find that the favoritism that ran rampant at Selland Auto Transport will be a thing of the past under this new agreement.

On the economic side, the most substantial improvement of the contract is in healthcare, as workers will move from an expensive and inferior company plan into high quality Teamster medical with significantly lower out-of-pocket cost. This means that for many workers, healthcare will improve dramatically while simultaneously putting an extra $500-$600 per month back in their pockets. In addition, all drivers will receive a wage increase, which for some drivers will be the first raise they’ve seen in more than nine years.

“There are a lot of people I wish could be here today,” said longtime Selland-turned-North American employee Tim Charles, a Teamsters Local 174 member who served on the rank-and-file bargaining committee and attended all negotiating sessions through the endless four-year slog. “So many people left the company as this process dragged on, and I don’t blame them. I just wish they could be here to celebrate this with us. This contract is going to change everything, and I’m so glad we finally made it to the finish line.”

“It’s a new day at this company and a new day for these hardworking Teamster drivers and mechanics,” said Roy Gross, Assistant Director of the IBT Carhaul Division and lead negotiator of this contract. “Everyone involved can now move forward and focus on doing what we do best: our members will focus on transporting vehicles safely and efficiently, and company management will focus on growing and earning back the business that Selland management lost.”

“This contract is the best possible outcome to a grueling and pointless battle,” said IBT Carhaul Division Director Kevin Moore. “The former Selland management learned an important lesson here: going to war against the people who make your money for you never pays off. We are thankful that North American Auto Transport was able to negotiate fairly and reach a good contract, and most of all, we are all thankful the fight is over now and these workers can move on to a brighter future under a strong Teamster contract.”

Said Local 174 Secretary-Treasurer Hicks about the deal: “This contract will be the template to restore the once mighty but currently nonexistent Carhaul industry in the West under the leadership and guidance of Brother Moore. Drivers in this specialized field will finally realize the value they provide to these companies.”

XPO Workers in Erie, Pennsylvania Seek Teamster Representation Workers Want Respect, Retirement Security and Affordable Health Care: XPO freight drivers in Erie, Pennsylvania filed for Teamster representation on April 9, 2019, the latest action by workers across the U.S. who are banding together to fight for fair treatment at one of the largest transportation and logistics companies in the world.

The workers are seeking fair wages and are seeking affordable, quality health care, retirement security and respect on the job. They are planning to join XPO freight workers in Laredo, Texas; Los Angeles; Miami, Florida; Aurora, Ill.; King of Prussia, Pa.; Trenton, N.J. and Cinnaminson, N.J. who have already joined the Teamsters.

“We’re looking forward to working with the employees at XPO and helping to improve their workplace environment and their life,” said Steve Getz, President of Teamsters Local 397 in Erie. “We will stand with these workers as they form their union.”

Port, freight and warehouse workers at XPO are coming together across the country in their fight for fairness, dignity, and respect.
 

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